Why Sustainable Architecture is the Future

Sustainable architecture holds the key to an environmentally positive future. Only by living more economically with our resources can we hope to protect our environment and climate. So what better way to live more sustainably than by making sure the very structure of our built environment is greener?

The philosophy behind sustainable architecture is all about reducing waste. This not only means physical waste but minimising energy loss as well. By keeping the energy we consume within our buildings for as long as possible, we need less supply in the first place. Using less energy to keep us comfortable means that we can become environmentally responsible and more resource efficient, which are both vital to reducing the effects of climate change.

Governments around the globe are looking at initiatives to make new builds and retrofits more sustainable. The Green Deal was launched in the UK on the 28th of January. This policy is a government initiative designed to persuade businesses and homes to retro-fit green technologies in their buildings. There are also initiatives such as the Passivhaus standard, which sets clear requirements for certificated buildings. As the name suggests, this approach to low energy housing originated in Germany during the early nineties. To meet the standard, a ‘Passivhaus’ must meet an energy demand target. A number of these sustainable assessment methods for architecture exist including BREEAM and LEED.

But while a building might be incredibly energy efficient, the structure’s building materials could still have a huge impact on the climate.

In his book, How Bad are Bananas, Mike Berners-Lee calculates that building a new two bed cottage produces the equivalent of 80 tonnes of carbon equivalent emissions. The majority of this impact is in the walls and the materials used. Much of these emissions can be recouped by using energy efficiency methods while the house is occupied. Yet, if sustainable building practices can reduce the impact of the construction in the first place then this is preferable if we are to become more environmentally conscious.

Construction materials such as rammed earth and building techniques like turf roofs are proven to have less impact whilst holding their own when compared to established but unsustainable methods.

So there are three overriding concerns when designing buildings with better considerations towards ecological impact. The first is the materials used for construction. The second concern is the energy efficiency of the building and the last factor to consider is the location of the building itself. The building might be energy efficient and use low impact construction technologies but this would not mean anything if the ecosystem suffers as a result of the building.

A greater holistic approach to all of these design factors is becoming more prevalent in mainstream architecture.

By looking at what builders have done in the past, forgotten construction techniques that might not be as redundant as previous generations thought, as well as cutting-edge technologies we can inform a brighter future. Our built environments will have less impact on the natural surroundings. This truly is a growing industry and the future of architecture.

Photostory: learning about the incredible properties of lime

 

Students studying for their MSc in Advanced Environmental and Energy Studies learned about the incredible properties of lime as a building material during a recent practical at CAT.

The hands-on approach is an important aspect of learning at the Graduate School of the Environment, which has lots of facilities for teaching about renewable energy and sustainable building methods onsite, including a lime kiln.

Lime has been used for thousands of years to finish buildings, though was replaced by cement in the 19th Century. There’s recently been a resurgence of interest in lime, however, as sustainable building materials have become more popular.

At CAT, we experiment with different environmentally sound building methods. If you’re interested in pursuing graduate study in sustainability, come along to one of our upcoming open days to find out what studying at CAT is like!