Podcast: what will the next 40 years of the environmental movement bring?

Two weeks ago students on our MSc Architecture: Advanced Environmental and Energy Studies course came to CAT for the annual politics module. This time, the module featured discussions on everything from green economics to behaviour change, and we’ll be presenting some of these lectures as podcasts in the coming weeks.

At the end of the week, students got a chance to put their questions to an expert panel featuring CAT’s media officer Kim Bryan, CAT’s external relations officer and Zero Carbon Britain director Paul Allen and Green Party Councillor Andrew Cooper. This podcast is an excerpt from the end of the discussion, as the panel debate the main achievements of the environmental movement’s 40-year history, and consider what the next 40 years will bring. The first speaker is Paul, followed by Kim and then Paul. The adjudicator is Adrian Ramsay.

Previous podcasts

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Why Sustainable Architecture is the Future

Sustainable architecture holds the key to an environmentally positive future. Only by living more economically with our resources can we hope to protect our environment and climate. So what better way to live more sustainably than by making sure the very structure of our built environment is greener?

The philosophy behind sustainable architecture is all about reducing waste. This not only means physical waste but minimising energy loss as well. By keeping the energy we consume within our buildings for as long as possible, we need less supply in the first place. Using less energy to keep us comfortable means that we can become environmentally responsible and more resource efficient, which are both vital to reducing the effects of climate change.

Governments around the globe are looking at initiatives to make new builds and retrofits more sustainable. The Green Deal was launched in the UK on the 28th of January. This policy is a government initiative designed to persuade businesses and homes to retro-fit green technologies in their buildings. There are also initiatives such as the Passivhaus standard, which sets clear requirements for certificated buildings. As the name suggests, this approach to low energy housing originated in Germany during the early nineties. To meet the standard, a ‘Passivhaus’ must meet an energy demand target. A number of these sustainable assessment methods for architecture exist including BREEAM and LEED.

But while a building might be incredibly energy efficient, the structure’s building materials could still have a huge impact on the climate.

In his book, How Bad are Bananas, Mike Berners-Lee calculates that building a new two bed cottage produces the equivalent of 80 tonnes of carbon equivalent emissions. The majority of this impact is in the walls and the materials used. Much of these emissions can be recouped by using energy efficiency methods while the house is occupied. Yet, if sustainable building practices can reduce the impact of the construction in the first place then this is preferable if we are to become more environmentally conscious.

Construction materials such as rammed earth and building techniques like turf roofs are proven to have less impact whilst holding their own when compared to established but unsustainable methods.

So there are three overriding concerns when designing buildings with better considerations towards ecological impact. The first is the materials used for construction. The second concern is the energy efficiency of the building and the last factor to consider is the location of the building itself. The building might be energy efficient and use low impact construction technologies but this would not mean anything if the ecosystem suffers as a result of the building.

A greater holistic approach to all of these design factors is becoming more prevalent in mainstream architecture.

By looking at what builders have done in the past, forgotten construction techniques that might not be as redundant as previous generations thought, as well as cutting-edge technologies we can inform a brighter future. Our built environments will have less impact on the natural surroundings. This truly is a growing industry and the future of architecture.

ZCBlog: Discussing a zero carbon future

The new ZCB report will layout a scenario for an emissions free 2030 but one of the wider project aims is to raise awareness for a more carbon responsible society. Because of this, the new report will include a series of discussion papers about how ZCB relates to wider topics.

The third ZCB report will focus on a number of specific areas for a 2030 scenario. However, the team would like to discuss how ZCB could relate to other subjects. The ZCB project is looking for contributors who want to use the ZCB scenario to highlight how reducing carbon emissions will affect the UK. These discussion papers should tackle themes and issues that are outside of ZCB’s core research.

Sure, the ZCB team have researched how to eliminate carbon emissions in energy production and land-use but how will the scenario affect less quantifiable subjects. For instance, how would the ZCB scenario affect wellbeing? Could it create or diminish green spaces for recreation?

Each “ZCB and…” discussion paper should be no more than 1,000 words but preferably be between 600 and 800. If you wish to be involved then let us know! You can get in touch here.

Not sure what subject to tackle? ZCBlog will be featuring news articles next week that reflect what is happening in relation to decarbonising the UK.

How can we overcome political and environmental barriers for change?

 

The Centre for Alternative Technology hosted it’s first environmental question time earlier this month. The subject for discussion was politics. A whole host of questions were put forward by CAT’s postgraduate students and also by the general public online via twitter.

The event was part of the politics module for the MSc Architecture: Advanced Environmental and Energy Studies course and gave postgraduate students the opportunity to discuss the subjects they have been studying. On the panel were Paul Allen, project co-ordinator for Zero Carbon Britain; Kim Bryan, CAT’s media officer and a freelance writer on environmental issues; and Andrew Cooper who is chair of the association for green councilors and energy spokesperson for the green party in England and Wales.

The debate was chaired by Adrian Ramsay, former Deputy Leader of the Green Party and visiting lecturer for CAT. Here is just a taste of the impassioned debate that ensued:

Adrian Ramsay: The Green Deal is considered underwhelming and unlikely to achieve the required level of carbon reductions. What would the panel recommend as a viable alternative national scheme?

Paul Allen: I’d recommend the Green New Deal. The economic stimulus would be beneficial. Fuel prices are coming, the days of cheap abundant oil are long gone. An economic stimulus could create a huge amount of jobs and get people back to work… help get the economy back on track. So have a look, not at the Green Deal but the Green New Deal.

Kim Bryan: It’s better than nothing. At least we are trying to encourage change and… make houses more energy efficient. It is a step in the right direction.

AC: It’s not a step forward, it’s a step backwards. Now we have a policy which is going to produce less jobs and less work. Ultimately we need a compelling offer. That’s not going to happen with the Green Deal.

AC: I do wonder in reality if these things are the other way round; green politics disappear from the agenda during elections. It seems like the government has a bit of a one trick pony regarding economic stimulus. The Green New Deal is a way to move it on. Passivehaus retro-fit is what is required but there’s not enough of that work going on.

AR (putting forward a question that was asked via twitter): Could renationalising the utilities help decarbonise the energy supply?

KB: I certainly think privatising the energy supply has not done us any favours. But we need to be promoting community energy schemes, people taking more control of their energy and their usage. Behaviour change and education is a huge part of any retrofit that we do because if we don’t do that then it doesn’t lead to carbon emission reduction.

AR (via twitter): Many green topics only enter politics as election issues. How can we get politicians to commit to environment in the long-term?

PA: Well, that’s the million, million dollar question isn’t it? The experience we’ve had with the creation of the Zero Carbon Britain energy scenario… we got to launch it at the all party parliamentary climate change group. But if we want the the minister to act on it there has to be a shift in public attitude.

AC: I think green issues and green politics are mainstream at the moment but it has to got to be framed in economic terms… to be seen as a solution for getting us out of the situation that we are in. The green politics are going to get us out of the problem.

AR: What do you think has been the [green] movement’s main achievement… and where will it be in another forty years?

PA: We’ve created a whole new vocabulary. There was no such thing as renewable energy [forty years ago]. It’s moved into the mainstream.

AC: This is mainstream technology, this is the way people are going to have to live in the future; future technology. This is now technology!

The event was a great success and the hope is that future debates can expand to include other topics for discussion.

The entire debate will soon become available as a podcast on the blog.

 

 

 

Volunteers get a taste of CAT

Josh on Volunteer Taster Session

 

This week CAT welcomed some volunteers for a taster session to show them what it’s like to volunteer at the Centre for Alternative Technology near Machynlleth.

Josh from Liverpool studied business management at university, and after travelling in Australia fancied a change of direction. “I wanted to try something different and unusual, so I’ve come to CAT to learn about gardening.”

The taster session gives volunteers an insight into life at CAT before they decide to stay for a longer period of time. Long-term volunteers can stay from two to six months, and there are several different areas in which volunteers can work:

•Natural Building Materials Research

Zero Carbon Britain

• Site Maintenance

• Water and Natural Resources

• Eco-cabins Maintenance

• Gardens

• Marketing/Media

The centre also works with local volunteers on a flexible and part-time basis. Click here for more information on volunteering.

Josh on Volunteer Taster Session

ZCBlog: How do we feed Britain and eliminate carbon emissions?

Laura Blake is Zero Carbon Britain’s food and diets researcher. Here, she looks at the main issues facing the food and diets team when proposing their scenario for a decarbonised 2030:

The ZCB scenario proposes some significant changes to land use in the UK.

However, the proposed reduction in meat consumption (particularly red meat) has raised many questions regarding livelihoods of farmers that specialise in livestock. ZCB also has to look at land suitability for other products such as food, biomass and woodland. Is it possible for livestock farmers to adapt to different industries in a scenario such as ours?

For me it also raises important questions about what we would eat. How would eating less meat affect future diets in the UK and what repercussion would this have for health?

It is generally accepted that we in the UK, and developed countries in general, are consuming higher amounts of meat than is recommended.

Current recommendations advise that individuals consume approximately 55 grams of protein per day. The UK average for 2011 was around 76g of protein per day and meat is one of the largest sources of protein in our diet. It has also been found that our diets contain too much saturated fat and meat contributes over 50% of our saturated fat intake.

Therefore, the proposed meat reductions in ZCB could have a significant health benefit for the population. A recent study on red meat, for example, found that reducing red meat consumption by just one serving per week could lower mortality risk by up to 19%.

Another study found that a reduction in livestock products could significantly reduce the risk of premature death from ischemic heart disease. Having said this however, the reductions in numbers of livestock that are required to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the levels required in ZCB may mean that we are left with a significant gap in our supply of protein as well as various other micronutrients such as iron and vitamin B12.

What can be used as a replacement of meat to fill this gap?

Plant sources of protein may be much more plentiful within the ZCB scenario but plant proteins are less easily absorbed and sources of the above micronutrients are limited. Today, many vegetarians use meat alternatives such as soya products to replace nutrients found in meat, but soya cannot be grown in the UK. So what could we use instead?

The proposed changes in our diet also raise questions of palatability. Bearing in mind the current diversity of eating habits within the UK, is it really possible to provide everything necessary to supply the UK population with a healthy diet within ZCB?

Land use and diets need to be considered when discussing the elimination of carbon emissions, especially in a scenario such as ZCB. But as you can see, there are so many questions that face this line of research.

We do not know the answers yet but that is what the new ZCB report will address come the summer!

For more information on food and diets please contact me at laura.blake@cat.org.uk

ZCBlog: Artist in residence

Hello! My name is Joanna Wright and I’m the artist in residence with Zero Carbon Britain for the next year.

I’ve been inspired by CAT since my first visit, over 10 years ago, and I’d firstly like to say thanks to CAT and the ZCB team for having me, to the Arts Council of Wales, who have made this residency possible and to Oriel Davies in Newtown, for their support.

We accept the way we live today as normal, but how did we get here, and where are we going?

The team at ZCB are an amazing and dedicated group. They are in the process of building a picture of what a future Britain can look like. How we’ll live, where our power will come from, what we’ll eat, how we’ll travel, and what we can do as society to affect positive change.

Research coordinator Alice has drawn it out in this diagram, it looks easy doesn’t it?

I hope that, in a small way, the work I do during the residency can make the work of the Zero Carbon Britain team more visible to a wider audience.

As an artist and documentary filmmaker much of my recent work uses existing archive material and oral history recordings. For part of my research for this residency I have started to look at how people in the past imagined the future

Through archive we have an opportunity to gain insight and reflection into where we stand in relation to the time that the original material was produced, and perhaps, where we might go from here.

You can see some postcards by artists from 19th century France imagining what the year 2000 would look like here. There’s an early forerunner of Skype in one of the pictures.

And there’s a link here to a film clip about petroleum products from the 1950’s here. (Warning, contains slight nudity!)

If you are coming to CAT then please feel free to come and visit me, I’d love to talk to you. Work in progress and research during the residency will be updated online at the Zero Carbon Archive.

You can contact me via email at joanna.wright@cat.org.uk , or follow on twitter @joanna_martine

Christmas presents that make a difference

 

If you like me have not even started Christmas shopping yet, you could either put your head in your hands and despair about our consumerist society or do what I did last year and give someone a present that can really make their year. Just before last Christmas, my Dad came up to CAT and was amazed by the wooden pole lathes and shave horses he saw as we walked around CAT. I suggested he might like to do a course; “that would be brilliant!” he said. A few months later he came to visit again armed with his notebook, pencil and a lot of enthusiasm to take part in the Greenwood Crafts course. He had an amazing time,  learnt loads and now has his very own shave horse in the garden shed.  My only problem is this year all my family want a course at CAT for Christmas.

Which is why it’s great that CAT is offering a 10% discount up until 31st December. So if you or a loved one have ever wanted to learn how to build a coracle, make forged tools, or construct gates and fences, give horse logging a go for a day, or spend an intensive week learning the art of sustainable woodland management from experienced woodspeople, now is your chance! I myself have enrolled on the Blacksmithing course and can’t wait, here’s hoping it’s the start of a brand new career.

CAT’s short courses are a great gift idea for anyone interested in learning skills in sustainable living; this festive season, why not give someone you love the opportunity to delve further into an interest, or to take a week out from the hectic pace of life in the tranquility of mid Wales?

Participants on CAT’s short courses enjoy delicious vegetarian meals and accommodation nestled in the foothills of Snowdonia, as well as expert tuition from well-renowned tutors and CAT staff.

Below are some of the fantastic courses on offer in 2013. Book before the 31st and make the most of the 10% discount now available!

Develop your skills in woodland management and crafts

Gates, Fences and Hedges: learn how to create gates, fences and hedges. Ideal for smallholders.
Horse logging: experience a low impact method for logging woodland
Sustainable woodland management: a fantastic introduction to all aspects of managing a small wood. Learn how to add social, economic and ecological value to woodland.
Greenwood crafts: discover the basic principles of transforming greenwood into products.

Reclaim traditional skills

Coracle building: build a traditional vessel used since the Bronze Age in a weekend
Hedgerow herbalism: discover how to produce an incredible range of cosmetic and medicinal products from foraged materials
Willow basket making: spend a hands-on day learning how to weave with willow
Blacksmithing: learn how to use a low-tech, low-fuel charcoal forge and leave with the items you’ve made

Learn sustainable building skills

Strawbale building: learn this sustainable, simple and accessible building method
Make an earth oven: gain the skills to build an earth oven yourself, and secure a future supply of delicious pizza, breads and stews!

Podcast: how to talk about the environment so that people will listen

How can we talk about the environment so that people will listen? George Marshall from the Climate Outreach Information Network discusses how we can improve the way we talk about climate change and environmental issues at the 2012 CAT Conference.

You can stream the lecture here, or

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

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Previous podcasts

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