Why is the continued support of renewable wind energy important in the UK

Over the coming decade the world faces enormous challenges; a changing climate, dwindling fossil fuels reserves and rising energy demands are interconnected problems that demand a common solution. In the words of Bob Dylan, ‘the answer my friend are blowing in the wind’ and shining in the sun, flowing in the rivers and hitting the coast line of the UK 24 hours a day, seven days a week in the form of an infinite supply of renewabley generated energy.

The Centre for Alternative Technology has been working since 1973 to explore solutions to the environmental challenges we face. CAT supports wind power as a means of generating renewable electricity. Given the reality of diminishing fossil fuel resources and the overwhelming scientific evidence on climate change, we believe that the UK should reduce and eventually stop the use of fossil fuels as soon as possible.

In our Zero Carbon Britain 2030 report (www.zcb2030.org) we have outlined how the whole of the UK can be powered using renewable sources. Wind power, both on- and offshore, is the biggest single potential source of renewable energy available in the UK in the short- or medium term. The UK enjoys an enormous wind resource that is proven, cost efficient and infinite.

The UK is the windiest country in Europe, so much so that we could power our country several times over using this free fuel. A modern 2.5MW turbine at a reasonable site will generate 6.5 million units of electricity each year, enough to meet the annual needs of over 1,400 households, make 230 million cups of tea or run a computer for 2,250 years.

Wind turbines do have an impact on the local environment where they are built, and for some people they “spoil the view”. But change is coming whether we like it or not- given that we will not simply stop consuming energy, we will need to accept some form of power generation technology. Compared to the devastating effects associated with the use of fossil fuels and nuclear power, renewable energy is the best option in the UK, wind power has an enormous role to play within that energy mix.

The UK has enormous potential to take a lead in renewable energy generation, bringing benefits to the economy and providing many needed jobs. Wind power could deliver more jobs and more income for local people than it currently does. This can be achieved through encouraging community ownership of wind turbines and a UK manufacturing industry. In this way, we can generate a sustainable source of income from the sale of electricity and well paid permanent qualified jobs.

Opposing this technology without suggesting alternative means of power generation that don’t just offload the negative impact on people in other countries (as with climate change) or future generations (as with nuclear) is irresponsible. We must take action now and avoid committing future generations to years of climate, energy and economic insecurity

CAT is pleased to be hosting The Future for Renewable Energy  in Wales conference on the 17th of October 2011 for further information on the conference please check out the  Renewable Wales Network website

This article is an edited version of one that appears in the Public Service Review

Five blogs about wind power you should be reading

 

Hugh Piggott’s Blog
Hugh PIggott teaches an extremely popular corse at CAT on building a wind turbine. His blog has interesting updates about wind power projects happening all over the world, including lots of great photos.

Winds of Change
Fascinating posts on the political side of wind power. By its own edict, the blog seeks to campaign for “truth in the battle for renewable energy” and has been archived by the British Library.

Yes 2 Wind
This organisation promoting wind power has various resources, including an interesting news page to keep you up to date on the latest developments.

Action for Renewables
Featuring a comprehensive wind farm locator for the UK which enables you to find wind farms in development if you’re interested in supporting a wind farm project.

I Love Windpower
Inspiring organisation that develops open-source wind power projects in developing countries. Their news page provides absorbing reading about their work.

Renewable energy in Wales: conference at CAT October 17th

Current protests over wind power are threatening the future of the renewable energy industry in Wales, slowing down the development of sustainable low carbon technologies and starving our communities of vital investment in regeneration, jobs and infrastructure. Furthermore, they are obstructing the development of green skills, training and research which could revitalise our manufacturing industry to the benefit of many small and large businesses. It is time for the renewable energy industry and its supporters  to work together to communicate a shared vision to build a sustainable, low carbon Wales and rebuild confidence and trust in the future of our Welsh green economy and the many benefits that renewable energy offers.


The Future of Renewable Energy in Wales / Centre for Alternative Technology / October 17th / book your place


The conference in October will provide a forum for discussion over a new vision to deliver a successful future for clean energy generation in Wales. Ultimately this may lead to the launch of a broad organisation to speak for all individuals and organisations that want to see Wales do more to generate electricity from renewable sources.

Turbine Nacelle

Thursday podcast: Sir John Houghton. An introduction to climate science

This lecture was delivered by Sir John Houghton, former chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, as part of CAT’s Renewable Energy and the Built Environment postgraduate course.

You can stream the podcast or

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Quote from the podcast:

We are beginning to change [the planet] in ways that I, certainly as a young scientist, never imagined we would be able to change it. But we are making big changes on a global scale which are having big international impacts, especially on poor people.

 

 

Previous podcasts

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Discussion event hosted by CAT – 4th November 2011: “Is energy security a toxic concept?”

Our current energy challenges are both unique and unprecedented; it is vital we explore how best to frame solutions to such important issues. Energy security¹ is becoming an increasingly used term, driven by a growing realisation that the days of cheap oil may be over. CAT is pleased to be hosting this workshop to explore the various ways this term is used by the different players and seeks to help move forward our understanding on how best we frame our proposed solutions.

Paul Allen External Relations director, Centre for Alternative Technology


Dulas Room, WISE Building, Centre for Alternative Technology, Machynlleth, SY20 9AZ
4 November 2011 10.00-17.00
To book email info@pirc.info

 


5 blogs about domestic renewable energy you should be reading

 

YouGen Blog
A popular blog, with a useful filter enabling you to find posts by selecting the category you’re interested in. The host site is a mine of information about all aspects of renewable energy for the home.

Renewable Energy Law Blog
Detailed and technical blog about renewable energy development. A great place for information around the changing laws surrounding renewables, this blog keeps you informed about the debate.

Renewable Energy Blog
Though it also hawks free quotes, this frequently updated blog provides a lively and variable source of news about renewable energy.

Green Energy Net Blog
Packed with lengthy, well-researched articles, this blog provides interesting commentary on renewable energy. While not exactly light reading, it’s a great source of information and analysis.

The Green Energy Blog
While perhaps not everyone’s cup of tea with its preference for Top Ten lists and consumerist leanings, this blog nevertheless interesting information about environmentally friendly products and innovation from solar powered gadgets to clothes made from recycled plastic.

PV Roof

Our students have been experimenting with solar power: report from renewable energy Masters module in solar photovoltaics

Good news, bad news and controversy have forced the topic of solar photovoltaics (PV) into the headlines over the last couple of months. The good news is that the quarter between April and June saw the fastest ever growth in solar installation in the UK. 14,500 new systems were installed. This boom in solar installation, fuelled by the government’s Feed in Tariff, has created new jobs and connected 122 MW of new solar power to the grid.

[twothirds]The controversy revolves around this issue of the size of the new PV installations. Since August only installation under 50Kw have been eligable for the top rate of Feed in Tariff payments. (To give you a sense of what that means our biggest PV roof is 20Kw). The government’s intention was to stop large subsidy payments going to so called “solar farms”; solar installations that exist purely to sell green electricity to the grid. Before the cut in subsidy Caroline Lucas warned that it would hamper the development of Britain’s fledgling solar industry saying that it would be “bad news for jobs, bad news for the economy and bad news for the environment”. The change in policy dealt with the solar farm issue, but also dealt a blow to community scale solar developments and large solar installations planned for schools, hospitals and housing associations.

Regardless of the various political wrangles over subsidies and funding, PV is a vital part of the energy mix. It’s important that people understand how to install,  design and specify appropriate PV systems. Last week a group of students on our Renewable Energy and Built Environment master’s course spent a week getting to grips with the technology. This was actually a two week ‘double module’. As well as learning how to install and specify solar PV systems students also set up an experiment that runs for the month in between the two week long modules. This year the students compared the output of several systems they temporarily installed on the roof of the WISE building.

Student Richard Jackson explains: “We split into five groups. Each group had to design, and then build a different kind of PV installation. This obviously includes everything you’d need to do on a real commercial installation: positioning the system based on a computer analysis of shading and local weather patterns, physically building the structure for the systems and then doing the wiring”.

PV Roof

The student’s experiment was designed to compare the output of solar systems that track the sun. The solar installations most of us are familiar with are simply fixed, immovably to a roof. What the students wanted to find out is whether the output can be increased by making the solar panels move and track the sun across the sky. “We tested several commercially available systems that can move a solar panel so that it either follows the sun across the sky, or constantly moves searching out the lightest part of the sky even on cloudy days”.

Students are increasingly looking for places where they can learn about this technology in a practical way. Designing, installing and experimenting with solar systems is becoming an increasingly popular option amongst students on all of our master’s courses.

Regardless of the controversy around PV and the Feed in Tariff, PV is still a technology with the potential to create jobs and supply the grid with low carbon electricity. It’s vital that people get to grips how it works and continue to experiment with ways of improving it.[/twothirds]

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Solar powered irrigation for developing country growers. Testing and development taking place at CAT.

by Nick Jefferies

In poor rural communities around the world, one of the only ways of earning extra income is by growing vegetables and fruits to sell at the local market. The key to growing these crops is irrigation. Most current irrigation methods use either labour intensive manual pumps or expensive, carbon-emitting diesel engines. While undertaking my Masters at CAT in Renewable Energy, I came across a small-scale solar thermal technology being developed that offers an alternative method for irrigation pumping.

The system uses a parabolic dish to focus the sun’s heat onto a boiler to produce steam power that drives a simple type of reciprocating engine pump. Having contacted the inventor, I travelled to Holland to see the pump in operation and determine whether I could contribute to further development. This led me to travel to Ethiopia last September where I spent two months monitoring the engineering performance and socioeconomic issues related to pumps installed on ten farms around the town of Ziway.

Data indicated that the system could produce 2,500-5,000 litres/day from a depth of 5-13m, allowing for a cultivated area of 500-800 sq m. If good growing practices are followed, this means the cost of the pump could be paid back in less than one year. Monitoring also showed that the equipment was simple enough to allow farmers to operate the system independently. One key finding was that the overall efficiency of the system, calculated by comparing incoming solar energy to hydraulic energy output, was about three times less than expected. The main reason for this under-performance was identified as an incorrect sizing of one of the steam engine components.

This issue will be addressed in the next development stage, leading to a large increase in daily pumped volume, and thus directly improving the income potential and marketability of the solar steam pump.

The Ashden Awards: CAT wins leading environmental award for training the green workforce of the future

At a prestigious awards ceremony in London on Thursday 16 June CAT was awarded the Ashden Award for Training in Sustainable Technologies. The Ashden Awards are the world’s leading green energy awards and CAT won for its achievement in training and inspiring people to work in green technologies through a range of postgraduate and professional courses.

The Ashden Awards showcase practical solutions to combat climate change, rewarding outstanding and innovative low-carbon schemes in the UK and developing countries. CAT received the Award from Grand Designs presenter, Kevin McCloud and £10,000 to be spent on expanding their sustainable energy work.

The world-leading centre for practical learning on sustainable energy and architecture is among five UK winners, all of whom are leading the way to a low-carbon society.

CAT, which was established 35 years ago, impressed judges with its range of innovative short courses and postgraduate degrees. Its courses are unique in combining hands-on experience with top-grade academic teaching, and their work is crucial in consolidating the skills and know-how required for a green economy.

Nearly 4,000 students have already benefited from the hands-on experience offered by on-site technologies such as hydro, wind, solar and biomass; the access to leading practitioners in their fields; and the inspiring community that has evolved at CAT.

The recently completed award-winning WISE (Wales Institute for Sustainable Education) building provides accommodation for students, but it also serves as a practical example of sustainable architecture and is used by students for practical elements of their courses.

Over the past five years, CAT has educated over 1,400 MSc students and had over 2,100 people attend short courses in sustainable energy, including 370 for accreditation in the installation of renewable energy technology.

Sarah Butler-Sloss, Founder Director of the Ashden Awards, said:
“To transform the UK into a low-carbon nation we need vision, investment, skills and infrastructure. CAT’s training and education programmes are helping bridge the gaping skills gap that we face in the green technology sector if we are hoping to address climate change and energy security. The challenge now is to step up our game, and replicate approaches like this in every corner of the country, to create a better future for us all.” Zero Carbon Britain

Commenting on receiving the award, Paul Allen, External Relations Director at CAT said:
“We are thrilled to receive such prestigious recognition from the Ashden Awards and very proud of the work we do at CAT. Many students go on to work in the green sector as consultants, public sector specialists or some set up their own businesses. Our approach is helping create experts with the skills and knowledge the UK needs to speed the transition to a low carbon economy.”

CAT plans to develop its educational work and continue to promote its Zero Carbon Britain strategy to increase its profile. The Centre’s Graduate School for the Environment recently launched a new MSc course, MSc Environmental Change and Practice: Buildings, and is working to increase student numbers on all its courses.