Vietnamese farming expert to visit Machynlleth to discuss climate change and rural livelihoods in CAT’s Quarry Cafe

1_village1The Centre for Alternative Technology presents, Earning a Living in a Changing Climate: A Vietnamese Perspective on Climate Change, combined with good food and conversation in a free talk this Thursday at 7.30 in CAT’s Quarry Cafe in Machynlleth.

The guest speaker Nguyen Quang Minh, is Livelihoods Programme Coordinator for Oxfam Great Britain and works with some of the poorest people in Vietnam to help them earn a living.  Minh will talk about the impacts of climate change in Vietnam and some of the practical solutions for communities to adjust to these pressures.

“Though at opposite ends of the world there is actually a lot in common between what Minh does in Vietnam and what the Centre for Alternative Technology does. Machynlleth has an established Oxfam group and so bringing Minh to Mach is a great chance for supporters to hear first hand about the work their support enables.”  Representative from Oxfam Cymru.

Minh will cover issues from food, income, climate change and the gender challenges that Vietnamese communities face through his everyday work and how he is tackling these issues through initiatives such as community based forest management as well as policy and grassroots work to develop long-term livelihoods to help overcome poverty.

Over the next two weeks Minh will be visiting Wales, as part of an ongoing project by Oxfam Cymru to bring the experiences of people working in the developing world to communities in Wales.

Food will be served in the Quarry Cafe from 6.30, in time for the talk at 7.30 followed by a question and answer session. Join us for a stimulating debate over dinner, at the Quarry Café and find out how your support for Oxfam Cymru could help to change the lives of others across the world.

Turned on! The UK’s First Micro Grid Goes Online

This week, Jase Kuriakose an engineer at CAT turned on the UK’s first totally renewable micro grid. The systems works by combining all the wind, solar, bio mass and hydro energy we produce at CAT and storing it in a battery bank. When it needs more energy it simply connects to the grid through an intelligent electronic control device to take more, when we are producing too much it gives the energy to the national grid.

Jase, the engineer behind the island generation project
Jase, the engineer behind the island generation project

Currently we waste around 65% of energy from power stations by transporting it to our homes, not only that but the electricity sector in the EU is responsible for over 1,2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide every year. Something that Jase says is unsustainable.

There is a vital need and enormous opportunity to move towards a more sustainable decentralised system, which protects the climate and provide future generations with secure energy.”

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