10 ways we can reclaim our energy supply

Would you like to live in a zero carbon future, where a whole new approach to energy has delivered benefits not just for the planet, but also for people and communities?

Rethinking how we access the energy we need is a key challenge as we work to build a zero carbon future. Changing our approach to the production and ownership of energy — who generates it, and who profits — could have many wider benefits, including for people and communities that could benefit financially from local renewable energy projects. Continue reading “10 ways we can reclaim our energy supply”

Building for a zero carbon future

Would you like to live or work in a warm, draft free, healthy space that is easy and cost effective to heat?

Transforming our leaky buildings to make them clean, green, healthy and affordable to heat is a big project, but we have all the knowledge and tools we need to do it – and it offers us many additional benefits. Here is a selection of good ideas on how we can transform our existing buildings and build new ones in much more energy efficient ways, so we have better places to live and work, and support the shift to a zero carbon future. Continue reading “Building for a zero carbon future”

Creating a zero carbon transport system

Would you like to be able to walk and cycle more easily and safely? To breathe clean air and enjoy a reliable, affordable public transport system?

Transforming our transport system from one that is highly polluting and heavily reliant on fossil fuels into one that is clean, green, reliable and affordable is a challenge, but it can be done. Here is a selection of ideas on how we can create a better transport system that’s not only healthier for us all, but is compatible with a zero carbon future.
Continue reading “Creating a zero carbon transport system”

CAT and OXFAM Changemakers

In a one-day collaborative workshop CAT’s own education officer Ann MacGarry worked alongside an educator from OXFAM to deliver a workshop for teachers in Cardiff entitled Exploring the refugee crisis and the movement of people. This was the latest part of the Changemakers project that CAT’s education team have been running with other organisations in Wales over the last few years, funded by the Welsh government.

The CAT contribution this year, in terms of content, was looking at the impact of climate change on migration, this turned out to be a very interesting area of research as it is not at all simple. The pattern is if crops fail or land and homes are flooded, people move to somewhere safe as close to home as possible, hoping to move back. However there are populations on the Pacific islands and in areas where the water sources have dried up permanently or become salty that cannot ever return home. It is also emerging that many of the most vulnerable people simply do not have the resources to move.

There is evidence for a link between a prolonged drought in Syria between 2006 and 2009 (the worst on record) and pressures that led to the uprising but there are many other factors as well, so it certainly does not seem to be the key cause.
Ann explained that she feels that there are three main points that need to be remembered when discussing this subject.

“Firstly, all the evidence suggests the impacts will get worse, secondly the impacts are going to fall mainly on areas without the resources to adapt and thirdly that it is the rich who produce the vast majority of the greenhouse gases, not the poor.”

ChangeMakers is a global citizenship project which gives both students and educators the opportunity to learn and think critically about issues surrounding our global refugee crisis before planning and taking appropriate action to create positive change.

Through her involvement in the project Ann said that she has learnt a lot but that it is worrying that so many of us are ignorant of who is really supporting refugees globally and the huge difficulties faced by the small number of support givers that do make it to these vulnerable communities.

She said that the teachers that were involved in the workshop in Cardiff were aware that they did not know enough but were very receptive and gave enthusiastic feedback on how they would use the resources available. The teachers also really valued the fact that the course was held in Oasis, the Cardiff centre for asylum seekers and refugees. Ann said that,

“It was encouraging that there are teachers out there who are keen to teach about these issues and schools who will enable them to go out for a day to educate themselves on this difficult and complex subject”.

changemakers