New Skills in 2014 – Hedgelaying and Restoration

We have a host of exciting new short courses taking place at CAT in the new year, so if you fancy learning something new in 2014 then what about the traditional art of hedgelaying? Our weekend course on Hedgelaying and Restoration will run between the 31st January and the 2nd of February 2014. Why is this skill so important?

The course involves both theoretical and practical learning onsite at CAT with Rob Goodsell. Students will learn about different types of hedges, the ecosystems found in them and the traditional tools used to create them. Rob is an experienced woodsman with a hands-on approach to learning. He is been a long-time member of the CAT staff, working in water resources and woodland management. His teachings emphasise the importance of sustaining vibrant landscapes by using sustainable methods and techniques.

Tutor Rob Goodsell

Nowadays, hedges are often ‘flailed’; the tops are cut off using large automated machinery. This technique is not very sustainable. Rob explains that “flailing breaks down the hedgerows and will not promote new growth of the plants and will negatively impact on species, such as bats, that use these corridors to navigate. Flailing looks neat but it is not good for the countryside.”

Most hedges in the UK have been maltreated for over 30 years, so bringing them back to life is vital. Learning how to construct hedges in a more traditional way promotes habitat corridors, while allowing the local flora and fauna to flourish.

Find out more about this course on our website. Until 31/01/2014 we are offering 10% off this short course.