Zero Carbon Britain discussed in the Welsh Assembly

 

Last Wednesday, the 16th of November, Zero Carbon Britain was discussed in the Welsh National Assembly during a Plaid Cymru debate on climate change. A motion was raised by Jocelyn Davies to propose that the Welsh government “affirms the targets of One Wales: One Planet and the Climate Change Strategy for Wales and welcomes the notable contribution to meeting these targets of the Centre for Alternative Technology in its strategy for Zero Carbon Britain 2030.”


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Of the report, Davies said that it “puts before us a clear analysis of what Britain as part of the United Kingdom could do to tackle climate change.” Later on in the debate – which highlighted concerns around the lack of global agreements of action on climate change – Rebecca Evans said that “if there is not urgent action on a global scale to tackle climate change there will be far-reaching effects on the world’s environment.” She then went on to say that:

The Zero Carbon Britain report states that, because climate change is a global problem, it lends itself to the denial of personal power and the blaming of others. It is easy for individuals to argue that their individual impact is not as great as that of some other people and so it is not their job to take mitigating action. The report also shows that, although many profess to care about climate change—and increasingly a large proportion of people are undertaking some actions to reduce energy use—the vast majority are continuing with patterns of behaviour that make the problem worse. For many people, there is a large gap between their concern about the environment and their actions. The report also shows that the reasons for this are many and varied and that different approaches must be employed in order to cause behavioural change in different people.

Zero Carbon Britain has made a significant impact since its release last year; it’s been read by Energy Minister Chris Huhne and has been downloaded 28,000 times. To keep on developing the report, and answer some of the crucial questions it raises, CAT is now looking to raise £80,000.